Discussion Points

Here is a short list of some points that have been brought to our attention along the way. Feel free to add your comments or thoughts.

Is the station wagon dead?

Our answer: Yes. Are there still mid-size wagon models offered today? Of course, but we are making a distinction between the classic American station wagons (full size, V-8, rear wheel drive, often with wood grain) that were an icon of post-war America, and the mid-size sport and luxury wagons of today, whose makers avoid the term "station wagon" like the plague. Volvo’s 2011 decision to stop selling their station wagon model in the U.S. was a nail-in-the-coffin for those of younger generations. (Read the article which first inspired this film.)
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Is the wagon “exclusively American?”

Our answer: Certainly other countries have produced wagons through the years, and they are particularly popular in Europe today (see question below), however, the station wagon as a cultural icon is uniquely American. We’re not trying to be narrow or be overly patriotic – we just think that the station wagon is a fascinating lens through which to view the broad strokes of American history in the twentieth century. That can’t be said of the wagon anywhere else – and if you don’t believe us, watch the film!
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Is my _____________________ a station wagon?

Our answer: We’ve found during the last year and a half that people vary widely on what they consider to be a station wagon. For us, we side with classic wagon enthusiasts who draw a line in the sand between the 1996 Buick Roadmaster -- which was the last full-size American station wagon -- and all other midsize wagon models that came after. One notable exception might be the short-lived Dodge Magnum. What about your Camry wagon? Your Subaru Outback? Your Volvo XC-90? We’ll let you guys debate that, but leave you with one thought: when you bought it, was it advertised to you as a “station wagon?”
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Why did you use a modified wagon in your trailer?

Our answer: We knew that featuring a GTO wagon (which was never actually built by GM) front and center might offend some purists, but it is a sweet wagon owned by a guy who lived near us and was nice enough to let us film him driving all afternoon for the purposes of creating a sexy intro to the film. And let’s be honest – don’t you wish GM had made that wagon?
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I heard there were a lot of wagons in Europe?

Our answer: That’s what we hear too, and we don’t doubt it – it really just adds to the irony of the story. We think it would make a great sequel if anybody out there wants to bankroll it :)
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I thought wagons were making a comeback?

Our answer: This is an interesting point that, unfortunately, we weren’t able to include in the film. It may be that mid-size wagons, which are more fuel-efficient than crossovers, do make a comeback – especially since the idea of a station wagon doesn’t have quite the negative stigma for kids of the '90s and 2000s (whose ill will is often reserved for the mini-van) as it did for kids of the '70s and '80s. However, this would at best be a epilogue to our story, which is about the rise and fall of the station wagon as an American icon. Certainly the golden age of the wagon will never be seen again.
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Are station wagons becoming more valuable in collector circles?

Our answer: Absolutely. One of the main reasons for this is that they are hard to find in good condition. Everyone took care of their muscle cars back in the day, but wagons were run into the ground and then junked, or used for parts.
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